Toyota to recall 185k cars globally, including Yaris

Toyota to recall 185k cars globally, including Yaris

July 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Budget , Recalls , Safety , Hatchback , Toyota Toyota has announced it is recalling a total of 185,000 vehicles worldwide for a power steering issue. Yaris and (overseas) Vitz models built between November 2010 and March 2012 could suffer a short circuit in their power steering control module if water gets inside. Should that happen, the power steering could fail, increasing effort when turning. The recall also includes the Verso-S and Ractis built from August 2010 to August 2011. The recall covers 130,000 vehicles in Japan and around 22,450 in Europe. Only 74 units are being recalled in the United States. Toyota says if the fault occurs, the vehicle will display the Electronic Power Steering warning light on the dash and a buzzer will sound. The automaker will alert owners by mail and dealers will replace the power steering control module free of charge. You can read the quick press release on the recall below for more information. Continue reading Toyota to recall 185k cars globally, including Yaris Toyota to recall 185k cars globally, including Yaris originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 04 Jul 2013 08:02:00 EST.

First live photos and impressions of Toyota’s 2014 Corolla

First live photos and impressions of Toyota’s 2014 Corolla

June 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Budget , Sedan , Toyota After releasing official pictures and a press release about an hour earlier, Toyota chose an aircraft hanger at the Santa Monica airport as the venue for the global introduction of its highly anticipated 2014 Corolla . Following an extended aerial acrobat show, which included performers running along the walls, swimmers romping in a massive overhead clear plastic pool and angry dancers destroying their cardboard stage in a glittery fit… the all-new C-segment star of the show was lowered on cables from the ceiling. (After the strobe lights and pounding sound that preceded it, the final vehicle reveal was almost anticlimactic.) Face-to-face with the eleventh-generation sedan, we liked what we saw. Compared to last year’s Corolla, the new model appears smaller in person – yet that is mostly an optical illusion. By the tape, it is four inches longer and slightly wider than its predecessor, but a bit shorter. The wheelbase has been stretched nearly four inches, yet the front and rear overhangs only give or take about an inch in the conversion. With the exception of the enormous wheel/fender gap (the new Corolla seems to ride too high), its overall proportions are very pleasing. The fresh sheet metal is modern and stylish, with sculpted lines that add character to a formerly bland sedan The fresh sheet metal is modern and stylish, with sculpted lines that add character to a formerly bland sedan (inexpensive does not have to mean boring). Thankfully, the new car lacks any tacked-on lower cladding to detract from its shape, and the sleek new LED headlights have allowed the designers to abandon the bulbous look of its predecessor’s front illumination.

Sen Grassley asks if Toyota got off easy with unintended acceleration debacle

Sen Grassley asks if Toyota got off easy with unintended acceleration debacle

July 13, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Government/Legal , Recalls , Safety , Technology , Toyota Toyota is facing further fallout from its recent unintended acceleration debacle, with Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) calling on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to reopen its investigation into the situation that led Toyota to recall some eight million vehicles. According to TheDetroitBureau.com, Grassley has written a letter to NHTSA director David Strickland, stating in part, “Key questions about the cause of unintended acceleration remain unanswered.” Grassley’s contention is that because neither of the two independent investigations into the issue produced a definitive cause or explanation, further digging is necessary. Most of the unintended acceleration incidents in the NASA and National Academy of Sciences reports not attributed to trapped floormats or other problems with accelerator pedals were blamed on driver error, according to the report, but both studies concluded that other unknown issues could be at play. According to Automotive News , Grassley is particularly concerned about the “tin whiskers” phenomenon, in which tiny threads of conductive crystal can grow on circuit boards. Toyota has responded to the Grassley letter, issuing a statement that reads, in part, “There is no problem with the electronic throttle control systems in Toyota vehicles – and all the scientific evidence confirms it. So-called ‘tin whiskers’ are not a new phenomenon and do not represent a mysterious or undetectable problem in a vehicle’s electronics.” Sen Grassley asks if Toyota got off easy with unintended acceleration debacle originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 13 Jul 2012 13:27:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink

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