Expedition drives from Russia to Canada over North Pole…

Expedition drives from Russia to Canada over North Pole…

May 22, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Minivan/Van , Toyota , Canada , Specialty , Russia , Diesel No, a Ford Expedition did not drive from Russia to Canada via the North Pole, but that’s exactly what a team of intrepid explorers accomplished recently. Using specially-modified buses with massive tires, the group slowly drove 2,485 miles in 70 days over drifting ice, occasionally using a pickaxe to clear a path and staying on guard for chasms that could open up and plunge the team into the frigid arctic waters. Average speeds were about 6 mph, “at the speed of a (farm) tractor.” While the big tires technically allowed the buses to float if the need arose, the team preferred to stay out of the water to keep the suspension from getting coated in thick, hard ice. Falling in on foot would mean almost certain death. According to Phys.org , the buses were powered by Toyota diesel engines, but were built with prototype parts from a previous driving expedition to the North Pole. Right now, the machines are parked in a garage in Canada’s Resolute Bay while the the team rests up with family back home. They plan to continue their trek to back across the Bering Straight to Russia. If successful, the team may eventually offer a version of their buses for commercial sale. Expedition drives from Russia to Canada over North Pole… originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 22 May 2013 08:46:00 EST.

Toyota conquers Antarctic in jet-fueled Hilux pickups

Toyota conquers Antarctic in jet-fueled Hilux pickups

April 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Aftermarket , Truck , Etc. , Toyota , Specialty , Diesel , Off-Road Toyota has just wrapped up another impressive Antarctic expedition, this time traversing over 43,500 miles in the span of four months. In the process, the company says it snagged a new world record with three specially-prepared Hilux pickup trucks with each covering 5,903 miles of the frozen continent. Iceland-based Arctic Trucks handled converting the pickups for their stint in the cold, and while the alterations included creating at least two 6×6 versions, the 3.0-liter turbo-diesel engines had to be reworked to consume Jet A-1 fuel. In the low temperatures of the Antarctic, standard diesel would simply turn to jelly. The trucks were also outfitted with large tires running just 2-3 psi of air pressure, resulting in a contact patch around 17 times larger than a standard tire. Toyota reports the trucks ran incredibly well throughout the expedition and required no major repairs. Starting last November, Toyota sent a team of 10 Hilux trucks to the far south to establish fuel depots, a weather station and to support scientific expeditions along the way. Hit the jump for the full press release. Continue reading Toyota conquers Antarctic in jet-fueled Hilux pickups Toyota conquers Antarctic in jet-fueled Hilux pickups originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 02 Apr 2012 14:31:00 EST.

Icelandic off-road company sets record South Pole crossing

Icelandic off-road company sets record South Pole crossing

October 15, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Motorsports , Truck , Toyota , Off-Road Guinness recognized a new world record for the fastest overland journey to the South Pole this week. The expedition occurred in December 2010, when two modified Toyota Hilux trucks travelled 1,434 miles across the Antarctic High Plateau in 108 hours. That the average speed for the trip was just over 13 miles per hour gives an indication of the extreme conditions the drivers faced, at altitudes up to two miles above sea level. The expedition was organized by the Kazakhstan National Geographic Society and The Antarctica Company, and included four members: Konstantin Orlov and Stanislav Makarenko from KNGS, Andrey Myller from TAC, and Hlynur Sigurdsson from Arctic Trucks – the off-road tuning company that built the vehicles. Arctic Trucks used 170-horsepower, 3-liter turbodiesel Hiluxes for the expedition build, modified to carry a whopping 285 gallons of fuel, 74 in tanks and the rest in the bed. The Arctic Trucks Expedition AT44 gets its name from 44×18.5 tires fitted to 15-inch rims and run at tire pressures as low as 2 psi. The four-by-four ice-crawlers have five-speed automatic transmissions with part-time transfer cases and a 2.566:1 low gear. Besides carrying up to 1.3 tons, the trucks are equipped to tow an additional 1.5 tons on a trailer. The AT44 weighs in at 4,960 pounds and manages about 5 mpg in the Antarctic snow. Read the full press release after the jump .

Xplore plots a course of adventure for the Toyota 4Runner

Xplore plots a course of adventure for the Toyota 4Runner

August 11, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Aftermarket , SUV , Toyota , Off-Road It’s no secret that our friends at Xplore want you to see the country. The company is dedicated to building rambling rides that will let you venture to our nation’s most scenic parks. The newest creation rolling out of the Xplore garage is a trip-ready Toyota 4Runner that’s packed with the usual assortment of off-road goodies we’ve come to expect. Like all Xplore vehicles, the 4Runner can be equipped in stages. Three stages are available, and they range from an upgraded interior and a few external bolt ons to the expedition-grade 4Runner shown above. The full monty comes with a slew of ARB items such as a winch and front brush guard, as well as a set of Method aluminum wheels, upgraded suspension components and extra beefy BFGoodrich Mud-Terrain tires. The 4Runner joins the Jeep Wrangler , Jeep Grand Cherokee and Toyota FJ Cruiser in the Xplore lineup. Each time a vehicle is sold, Xplore hands over a portion of the cash to the National Parks Foundation. Besides the keys to the car, you will also enjoy a one-year pass to visit the our National Parks and a subscription to the Xplore Lifestyle Journal, which basically provides you with excuses to go use your new vehicle as much as possible. See all the details in the press release after the break .

Tweeter button Facebook button Youtube button