Toyota Develops ‘Diamond-like’ Semiconductor Wafer to Boost Hybrid Mileage

May 27, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Toyota City, Japan – Toyota is using one of the hardest materials in nature after diamonds to develop a semiconductor chip it hopes will improve the fuel efficiency of its hybrids, such as the Prius, by as much at 10 percent. The company and its partners announced today that they have developed a silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor for use in automotive power control units. Toyota plans to begin test-driving vehicles with the technology on public roads in Japan within a year.

New Toyota semiconductors could increase hybrid fuel efficiency by 10%

New Toyota semiconductors could increase hybrid fuel efficiency by 10%

May 21, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Hybrid , Technology , Toyota , Electric Toyota may have an ace up its sleeve in the fuel economy wars, as it’s developed a new type of semiconductor that will allegedly help the company’s hybrids net a ten-percent improvement in fuel economy. The tech is still in development, although Toyota is already reporting five-percent gains during testing, six years before it plans to implement the new semiconductor in production vehicles, meaning the ten-percent improvement doesn’t seem like an untenable goal. That is, until you hear from Kimimori Hamada, the project general manager of Toyota’s electronics division. “We are aiming for great improvement in fuel economy and miniaturization,” Hamada told Automotive News . “This is a very challenging target.” The new semiconductors are made from wafers of silicon carbide, rather than just silicon. The compound is far more efficient, losing just a tenth of the energy that’s lost from a normal silicon semiconductor. That not only makes the semiconductor more efficient, but it allows Toyota to use a power control unit that’s 80 percent smaller. While the initial results are promising, silicon carbide is considerably more expensive than silicon, and once acquired, it’s more difficult to work with. “There are still enormous technical barriers,” Hamada said. New Toyota semiconductors could increase hybrid fuel efficiency by 10% originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 21 May 2014 10:15:00 EST.

Toyota Develops ‘Diamond-like’ Computer Chips to Boost Hybrid Mileage

May 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Toyota City, Japan – Toyota is using one of the hardest materials in nature after diamonds to develop a semiconductor chip it hopes will improve the fuel efficiency of its hybrids, such as the Prius, by as much at 10 percent. The company and its partners announced today that they have developed a silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor for use in automotive power control units. Toyota plans to begin test-driving vehicles with the technology on public roads in Japan within a year.

Toyota Brings “Car of the Future” Ride and Drives to the Big Apple

April 14, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

NEW YORK (April 11, 2014)

Toyota Fuel Cell Concept Sedan Debuts at 2014 Consumer Electronics Show

December 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

TORRANCE, Calif., (Dec. 18, 2013) –

Toyota to buck engine downsizing trend, may go larger and turbo-free

Toyota to buck engine downsizing trend, may go larger and turbo-free

October 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Technology , Toyota Turbocharging isn’t really Toyota’s specialty, and the Japanese automaker isn’t being shy about acknowledging it. Koei Saga, a senior managing officer in charge of drivetrain research and development, says that eschewing turbos and increasing displacement of engines using the Atkinson cycle can produce better power gains without sacrificing fuel economy, Automotive News reports . Toyota is investing heavily in larger-displacement Atkinson-cycle engines in addition to turbocharged engines, but Saga doesn’t think the automaker will use turbocharging across many product lines. He apparently remains unconvinced that the technology “makes the world better.” In Toyota’s eyes then, Atkinson cycle engines do make the world better, and here’s how . Their pistons complete four processes – intake, compression, power and exhaust – in one revolution of the crankshaft, and the power stroke is longer than the compression stroke. Traditional Otto cycle engines require two crankshaft revolutions to accomplish those same four operations and have equal-length compression and power strokes. Atkinson cycle engines are more efficient, but less power dense, though increasing displacement can offset that shortfall. In addition to the aforementioned technologies, Toyota is also investing more in continuously variable and fixed-gear automatic transmissions, as well as its fuel-cell vehicle program. As for electric vehicles? Saga is skeptical of them, stating that Toyota wouldn’t have developed the RAV4 EV if it weren’t forced to comply with California Air Resource Board regulations.

2014 Toyota Prius Plug-In to Start Under $30,000

October 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

TORRANCE, Calif., Oct. 9, 2013

2014 Lexus ES 350 Continues Its Segment-Shaping Ways

October 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The Lexus ES sedan line has a history of reshaping the entry-luxury segment, and the sixth-generation ES models introduced for 2013 raised the benchmark again, with increased interior room, a new hybrid, higher fuel efficiency in the V6 model and even more flagship-type amenities.

Toyota’s Indoor Ride Course Returns to Chicago Auto Show

January 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

CHICAGO (Jan. 22, 2013) – In the past two years, Toyota has entertained Chicago Auto Show attendees with indoor courses that highlighted the rugged durability of its trucks and SUVs, and the fuel-sipping attributes of its landmark hybrid vehicles.

Toyota patent hints at sportier iQ

Toyota patent hints at sportier iQ

December 9, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Budget , Performance , Etc. , Hatchback , Scion , Toyota Toyota may be hard at work on a new version of the company’s iQ microcar. The sleuths at Carscoop have managed to uncover a patent rendering of the fuel-sipping sub-compact wearing some considerably more aggressive bodywork. It’s unclear whether these designs are meant for the U.S.-market iQ or its Toyota-badged twin, but we’re more than a little intrigued by the vehicle’s widebody treatment. The kit looks to include a reworked front fascia and wheel arches along with a new rear valance that includes a diffuser and space for dual exhaust outlets. A massive rear spoiler looks to be part of the package, as well, along with side skirts to match the rest of the bodywork. What does Toyota have planned with this pint-sized bruiser? Your guess is as good as ours, but here’s hoping we hear something concrete from the company soon. Head over to Carscoop for additional renderings. Toyota patent hints at sportier iQ originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 09 Dec 2011 10:31:00 EST.

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