2016 Toyota Mirai starts at $57,500, lease for $499/month with free hydrogen fuel

2016 Toyota Mirai starts at $57,500, lease for $499/month with free hydrogen fuel

November 18, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Toyota , Electric The Toyota Mirai is coming to California next year and it will arrive bearing a $57,500 MSRP. Toyota says that with state and federal incentives worth a total of $13,000, interested customers will be able to buy a Mirai for under $45,000. If you’re more into leasing, then you can get the Mirai for $499 a month for 36 months (with $3,649 due at signing). Both options come with free hydrogen fuel for “up to three years.” The 2016 Mirai will be available in California in the fall of 2015 in a very limited supply – less than 200 vehicles in the fourth quarter – but as availability expands to the Northeast ( read: Boston and New York ), Toyota says it expects more than 3,000 to be on the road by the end of 2017. But there might be a catch. The $8,000 federal tax credit isn’t scheduled to last much longer. In fact, it could expire well before the Mirai is released. The current regulations say that , “The purchaser may claim a credit for the certified amount for a fuel cell vehicle if it is placed in service by the taxpayer after Dec. 31, 2005, and is purchased on or before Dec. 31, 2014.” That’s just a month and a half from now, while the car is almost a year away.

Toyota asking NHTSA for fuel cell car safety exemption regarding electric shocks

Toyota asking NHTSA for fuel cell car safety exemption regarding electric shocks

July 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Sedan , Technology , Toyota , Electric Toyota is requesting an exemption from federal safety regulations that govern electric cars as it prepares to launch a small-scale hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle fleet. The Japanese automaker is targeting Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 305 , which covers the packaging of high-voltage parts in electric cars. According to Uncle Sam, these systems need to be isolated so that passengers and first responders aren’t electrocuted in the event of a crash. That seems pretty smart, but it’s become a problem for Toyota’s upcoming production fuel cell vehicle, as the mechanism that prevents electric shocks in low-speed crashes will apparently simply keep Toyota’s car from even functioning. Instead of the federally approved system, Bloomberg reports that Toyota plans to insulate the high-voltage wires and cables in the car, along with shielding electrical components like the fuel cells, electric motor and batteries with (presumably non-conductive) metal barriers. It’s unclear if the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will bow to Toyota’s request, but the government safety watchdog might be swayed in light of the fact that the company is targeting a very small number of sales – 2,500 per year – and it still has a plan in place to protect first responders and vehicle occupants. Toyota asking NHTSA for fuel cell car safety exemption regarding electric shocks originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 30 Jun 2014 16:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds . Permalink

When Cars and Roads Communicate, Everybody Wins

June 22, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. (June 20, 2014) — Hideki Hada has worked in the automotive industry since 1989. During that time, he has seen increased concern from the government and people when it comes to automotive safety. As these concerns have risen, Hideki’s have risen with them. That is why in 2004 he joined Toyota Technical Center (TTC) as a Senior Engineer for the creation of government –industry collaborative projects to develop new wireless technologies for advancing active safety systems. Ten years later, Hideki is the General Manager of the Integrated Vehicle Systems Department at TTC.

Toyota Motor Sales Issues October 2013 Sales Preview

November 3, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

TORRANCE, Calif. (Nov. 1, 2013) – Toyota Motor Sales (TMS), U.S.A., Inc., today reported October 2013 sales results of 168,976 units, an increase of 4.8 percent over October 2012 on a daily selling rate (DSR) basis.

Australia may offer money to keep Toyota making cars there

Australia may offer money to keep Toyota making cars there

June 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Government/Legal , Plants/Manufacturing , Toyota , Australia In the wake of last month’s announcement that Ford will cease automotive and engine production in Australia after 2016 , many are wondering what the country’s other automakers will do. Holden has already confirmed it will stay the course despite Ford’s exit . Much of the GM subsidiary’s reason for sticking around has to do with a deal made last year between Holden and the Australian government. In order to secure a GM investment of $1 billion and a commitment to keep manufacturing in Australia through 2022, the government threw in an extra $215 million. According to Australia’s Minister for Innovation and Industry, Greg Combet, the government is now in talks with Toyota for a similar deal. Toyota operates one plant in Australia, the Altona manufacturing and engine plant in Victoria. The facility produces the Camry , Camry Hybrid and Australasia-only Aurion for both the local market and export. The report from GoAuto indicates that negotiations with the Australian government would include adding production of a third, all-new model at Altona, possibly the new RAV4 , because it shares many parts with the Camry. Mr. Combet did not say what amount the government would be willing to offer in exchange for an investment by Toyota and commitment to continue manufacturing in Australia, or whether it would be more or less than the Holden deal, but did confirm the talks were happening.

Porsche 911 is officially Germany’s most reliable car

Porsche 911 is officially Germany’s most reliable car

December 13, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Classics , Coupe , Hybrid , Performance , Europe , Government/Legal , Hatchback , Porsche , Toyota In Germany, having a reliable car is almost a rite of passage. That is, you won’t be granted passage onto the roadways if you’re car hasn’t passed the government’s strict testing regime. Called the Technischer

Tweeter button Facebook button Youtube button