Toyota responds to video of Highlander ramming house [w/video]

Toyota responds to video of Highlander ramming house [w/video]

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Safety , Crossover , Toyota There are, as they say, two sides to every story, so after we posted a video on Monday showing what an owner claimed to be a case of unintended acceleration causing her Toyota Highlander to crash into a house twice , Toyota reached out to us revealing some additional information about the incident. Following this crash, which took place back in November, Toyota had this Highlander inspected and pulled data from its Event Data Recorder (EDR), or Black Box as we’ve come to call it. Not only was this the first time we’ve seen a claim of unintended acceleration like this caught on video, but now, also a first, we have actual data showing what the vehicle itself recorded during this frightening ordeal. Brian Lyons, Toyota Communications Manager for Safety and Quality, first gave us some information about the Highlander in question, including the fact that it was a 2012 model. The 2012 Highlander came from the factory with a brake override system, meaning it was not part of the company’s initiative in 2010 to add the system to all 2011 models. Also, after looking at the data from the EDR, he said – as many of you pointed out in the comments for the previous post – that the “brake pedal was never touched.” In the video, you can see that the crossover’s brake lights never come on, and the EDR’s data backs this up. The data pulled from the EDR – posted in the gallery below as two images – shows the two “events,” which were recorded each time the vehicle impacted the house. In the first event , the data provided by Toyota shows that 3.6 seconds before the impact, the vehicle began to slow down before speeding up to almost 15 miles per hour as it slammed into the house. In the second event , which resulted in a more violent collision with the house, the Highlander reached speeds of almost 30 mph with the engine racing at 4,400 rpm. In both images, it shows that the brake switch was in the “OFF” position the entire time, indicating that the driver was not attempting to press the brake.

Watch a Toyota Highlander ram a house, twice [UPDATE]

Watch a Toyota Highlander ram a house, twice [UPDATE]

April 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Safety , Videos , Crossover , Toyota Toyota has had plenty of problems in recent years due to claims of unintended acceleration , and now here’s a video that actually catches such a claim on video. The driver of this 2010-2013 Toyota Highlander claims that the crossover’s accelerator got stuck causing the vehicle to slam into the house twice, and resulting in damage to the Highlander, the house and two vehicles inside the garage. While we don’t know when this accident took place, the video was uploaded to YouTube back in January. It is impossible to determine what actually happened in this video, but what we do know is that a security camera captures the Highlander slowly pulling into the driveway before it lunges forward slamming into the garage. With the tires squealing and metal crunching, the driver then shifts between reverse and drive a couple times causing even more property damage before spinning out in the street and finally being able to shift into Park. Scroll down to see the video for yourself. Whether unintended acceleration or driver error, this was undoubtedly a harrowing ordeal. UPDATE from Toyota: “Toyota’s technical team reviewed this incident and found the Event Data Recorder and the video itself confirm that the brakes were never pressed – as you can see, there are no brake lights in the video. ” Continue reading Watch a Toyota Highlander ram a house, twice [UPDATE] Watch a Toyota Highlander ram a house, twice [UPDATE] originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 15 Apr 2013 15:03:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds .

White House clears way for NHTSA to mandate vehicle black boxes

White House clears way for NHTSA to mandate vehicle black boxes

December 8, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Government/Legal , Safety , Ford , GM , Mazda , Toyota At present, over 90 percent of all new vehicles sold in the United States today are equipped with event data recorders, more commonly known as black boxes. If the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gets its way, that already high figure will swell to a full 100 percent in short order. Such automotive black boxes have been in existence since the 1990s, and all current Ford , General Motors , Mazda and Toyota vehicles are so equipped. NHTSA has been attempting to make these data recorders mandatory for automakers, and according to The Detroit News, the White House Office of Management Budget has just finished reviewing the proposal, clearing the way. Now NHTSA is expected to draft new legislation to make the boxes a requirement. One problem with current black boxes is that there’s no set of standards for automakers to follow when creating what bits of data are recorded, and for how long or in what format it is stored. In other words, one automaker’s box is probably not compatible with its competitors. Expect all these issues to be worked out “in the coming months,” according to NHTSA spokeswoman Lynda Tran. White House clears way for NHTSA to mandate vehicle black boxes originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 07 Dec 2012 10:16:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds .

Toyota Boosts Home Reconstruction in Joplin Since Devastating Tornado

November 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

JOPLIN, Mo., (Oct. 23, 2012) – Like most residents of Joplin, Tara Johnston’s mind is frozen in time when she thinks back to that late Sunday afternoon on May 22, 2011 – the day a catastrophic tornado destroyed thousands of homes, including her house on S. Jackson Ave.

Toyota goes creepy with new Prius People Person commercial

Toyota goes creepy with new Prius People Person commercial

September 25, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Hybrid , Marketing/Advertising , Hatchback , Toyota In the latest Prius family commercial by Toyota , actual actors, loads of computer animation and a miniature set combine to create the illusion of a Godzilla-sized man made of people. He then steps out of his house to find that his Toyota Prius has morphed into four vehicles: a regular Prius, Prius V , Prius C concept and Prius Plug-In . This is the end of Mr. People Person, as he quickly disintegrates, leaving only his size-bazillion shoes and a bunch of little people behind. Toyota’s narrative behind its Prius People Person ad states: Not long ago, there was one model of Prius for everyone to share. But now that one Prius has become a family: There’s one for everyone. There’s the original one, the bigger one, the smaller one and the one that plugs in. They’re all a little different, just like us. We’d say the spot makes sense conceptually, but it’s a bit over the top, and creepy to boot. See it for yourself after the jump and let the disintegration begin.

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