Toyota temporarily idles pair of Indian plants due to labor unrest

Toyota temporarily idles pair of Indian plants due to labor unrest

March 21, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Budget , Plants/Manufacturing , Toyota , UAW/Unions , India The Detroit News reported today that Toyota will restart production at two Indian plants, following a shutdown on Monday. Factory labor, management and police in Asia engage in the kind of violent altercations that we’re not used to, having almost entirely walked away from the overtly brutal relations epitomized by the Pinkerton Detective Agency and the Flint Sit-Down Strike . In India, a plant owned by a Ford transmission supplier plant was shut down in 2009 after incidents between workers and armed men around the same time as Ssangyong workers occupied a factory in South Korea , in 2012 Suzuki Maruti workers rioted over wages around the same time upset employees beat a ceramics factory president to death in retaliation for a labor leader’s killing. Toyota is the latest to company trying to avoid that road. The Detroit Free Press reported earlier this week that it shut down two plants in India after 11 months of acrimonious wage negotiations and arbitration have gone nowhere. Toyota said the plant workers in Bidadi, near Bangalore, had deliberately stopped production at times over the past 45 days and threatened management. The workers said they wanted their wages raised by an amount already agreed to by management, but that management had reneged; news reports weren’t clear on the amount, some saying nearly 10,000 rupees ($165 US) more per month, another saying 4,000 rupees ($65 US), but reports agree that Toyota has said it will only go as high as 3,050 rupees ($50 US). Terms of today’s resolution have not been released, but we do know that production will begin again on Monday, March 24. Toyota temporarily idles pair of Indian plants due to labor unrest originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 20 Mar 2014 18:03:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds .

Why Toyota Camry’s Korea Car of the Year win is a big-time upset

Why Toyota Camry’s Korea Car of the Year win is a big-time upset

February 26, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Sedan , Toyota , South Korea The 2013 Toyota Camry is officially the car of the year in Korea . The country’s motoring press graced the Japanese sedan with the honor for the first time, officially marking a shift in prevailing Korean attitudes toward Japan and its products. According to industry analysts, buyers in the country are no longer simply choosing their purchases based on whether or not they’re made in South Korea, but rather based on quality and personal choice. That’s a big jump from a few years ago, when buyers viewed their purchases through a patriotic lens. The Camry managed to edge out a total of 44 other cars, including hardware from both Hyundai and Kia , to become the first foreign vehicle to take home the Korea Automobile Journalist Association’s Car of the Year award. As The Detroit News points out, just 10 years ago, domestic manufacturers held some 99 percent of the Korean car market. But a change in trade regulations has opened up the country considerably, and buyers now have access to a wide range of products from around the globe. As a result, Hyundai and Kia have countered by cutting prices in an attempt to keep their grip on the market. Why Toyota Camry’s Korea Car of the Year win is a big-time upset originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 26 Feb 2013 07:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds .

Toyota Announces Exports of U.S.-Assembled Venza Crossover to South Korea

November 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

NEW YORK, Nov. 14, 2012 – Toyota today announced it began to export U.S.-assembled

Kyushu on the road to becoming Japan’s Motor City

Kyushu on the road to becoming Japan’s Motor City

July 22, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Japan , Plants/Manufacturing , Nissan , Toyota , South Korea The strong yen has Japanese carmakers looking to optimize every efficiency in order to keep their cars competitive in export markets. One strategy gaining momentum is to do some island hopping, specifically, moving plants and manufacturing to Kyushu, the southernmost main island in the Japanese archipelago. Car production there as a percentage of total Japanese production has doubled from 2001 to 2011, but more startling are the recent increases: Nissan just moved its Note and Caravan production there, Toyota is boosting production there by 600 percent, and total units made in Kyushu climbed 21 percent from 2010 to 2011. The three big factors involved are lower personnel costs, lower auto parts costs and increased productivity because of newer, more efficient factories. Companies can save ten percent on personnel in Kyushu versus traditional manufacturing centers like Aichi and Kanagawa, which are on the main island of Honshu and near major cities like Nagoya and Tokyo. Kyushu is also much closer to the South Korean peninsula, and the weakness of the South Korean won means importing lower-priced Korean auto parts is an even more attractive option. Japanese newspaper The Asahi Shimbun says it could soon be the Detroit of Japan. The prediction could be sped up if intergovernment talks can rework laws on transportation: it’s illegal for trucks with South Korean plates to drive on Japanese roads, so trucks hauling parts get shipped to Kyushu ports and their cargo is transferred to Japanese trucks. Japanese and South Korean officials are working to determine how to allow trucks from across the strait to travel unhindered from Korean auto parts factories to Japanese car factories. Kyushu on the road to becoming Japan’s Motor City originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 22 Jul 2012 12:02:00 EST.

Kentucky-built Toyota Camry headed to South Korea

Kentucky-built Toyota Camry headed to South Korea

December 7, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Filed under: Sedan , Plants/Manufacturing , Toyota , South Korea For years Detroit automakers carped about the low value of the Japanese yen versus the U.S. dollar, but these days, the opposite is true. The yen has rocketed up in value versus the dollar, and Japan’s automakers are taking significant measures to mitigate its bottom-line-killing effects. In October Toyota demanded lower prices from its Japanese supply base, and now the Camry will be built in the U.S. and shipped overseas. Toyota notes in the post-jump press release that it will build 6,000 Toyota Camry units in Georgetown, Kentucky and ship the units to Korea. The massive Georgetown plant employs nearly 7,000 employees working around the clock. This marks the first time Toyota will export the American-made Camry, yet Toyota isn’t new to U.S. exports. The automaker exports 100,000 vehicles built in the U.S.

Toyota to Export U.S.-Assembled Camry to South Korea

December 6, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

December 5, 2011 – New York, N.Y. – Toyota today announced plans to export U.S.-assembled Camry sedans to its distributor in South Korea.

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